Psychic Development Workshop: Cultivating Compassion, Exercise 2

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Amaya
@amaya
6 years ago
301 posts

NOTE: This post is part of a series. Find the index for the series here.

Hello everyone! Thank you to everyone who participated in the first exercisein this series. This week, we'll explore this topic further with a similar exercise, this time involving someone that you personally know.

The last exercise was mostly about recognizing that in order for your psychic ability to be helpful to others, it's important for you to be able to be objective about the situation that they're asking you for help with. Your goal, as a psychic, is to help a person in a way that's relevant to them.Recognizing that their moral foundation may be different from yours, and that it's okay for them to believe something that you don't,is something that you'll need to do quite often, if not all of the time.

The intent of thisexercise is similar and alsodifferent. As I alluded to in the last exercise, past hurts can create hot-buttons for us that can affect our ability to be objective about certain topics. The more we can release past hurts, the more objective we can be, which makesour psychic abilitymore usefulfor ourselves and others.

Also, past hurts can create feelings of anger, shame, guilt, and a lack of trust that can keep our intuitive ability at arm's length. Resolving past hurtscan be a first step in trusting ourselves and others, and trust is a key, if not THE key, ingredient in accessing your intuition.

Here's the procedure:

  1. Choose a personwho has hurt you in some way.
  2. Write an unemotional, unbiased account of this person's life and personality, centering on the aspects that may have led to the behavior(s) that caused you pain. Don't worry if you don't know very much about the person; just write what you do know. Write this in your journal oruse a private blog entry. You can even write it on a piece of scratch paper and toss it in the recycling bin when you're done.
  3. Keep it short; just jot down the main points. Again, we're not justifying bad behavior here, we're just looking for potential related factors. Your goal is to try to understand why the person may have chosen to do the hurtful behavior. Although it's not the focus of this particular exercise, if you receive empathic or intuitive impressions during this process, feel free to note those as well.
  4. Write a quick notedirectly to the person who hurt you. Tell the person that you don't think that he/she is a bad person. You do very much disliketheir behavior and don't support their hurtful choices AT ALL,but you are choosing to not allow their hurtful behavior to affect you anymore. Something like that.
  5. Finally, if you feel like it, post something here about what it felt like to you to do this exercise.
  6. Repeat the exercise as many times as you desire.

Bonus Meditation

If you are a meditator, I encourage you to try this guided meditation, focusing on thefeelings that came up for you while you did the exercise above. It's in .wma format, so if you are a Mac user, try this link instead.

If these exercises are starting to make you feel like the Karate Kid, I encourage you to practice your no-thought meditationsas much as possible. We'll start with adding visualizations to our meditations next week.


updated by @amaya: 07/02/17 12:29:37PM
Amaya
@amaya
6 years ago
301 posts

Thanks for sharing your experience! It sounds like a difficult situation.

I have to admit that I have a hard time forgiving people who hurt me. For me, it's much harder than forgiving a stranger for something awful that was done to another stranger. I know that it shouldn't be that way, that all people have equal value and all that, but I still find it difficult.

Kate postedthis quote on her Facebook page recently: "One should rather die than be betrayed. There is no deceit in death. It delivers precisely what it has promised. Betrayal, though ... betrayal is the willful slaughter of hope. ~Steven Deitz" I think that about sums up my feelings on the matter, too.

Remember that it's okay to believe both that he's a human being, and valuable simply for that fact, and to also believe that his behavior was hurtful. Separating who a person is from what a person does is something that I struggle with often, but I know that it's important to do it, like Esah mentioned in her comment on the last exercise, so I give it my best effort. I'm not always able to get to that point, though, in which case I revert to "compassion for myself", which is the topic of our next exercise. :-)

Amaya
@amaya
6 years ago
301 posts

I just try to stay away from that kind of judgment call.

Perfect! That's what I was going for with this one. I, too, am glad that it's not my job to assign penance for hurtful behavior. :-)

Amaya
@amaya
6 years ago
301 posts

Ah... Forgiveness. Recognizing that who a person IS and what a person DOES isn't necessarily the same thing, and that it's not our job to assign punishments when peoplehave treated us badly is such a relief, isn't it? It does take constant practice, though! Thanks for doing this exercise and letting us know how it went!

Amaya
@amaya
6 years ago
301 posts

Thanks for sharing your experience!

Amaya
@amaya
5 years ago
301 posts

Wow! Thanks for sharing your experience, Keisa! I've always had a hard time understanding what "forgiveness" meant, or why it was important. The conclusion I finally came to was that forgiving is nothing more than recognizing that I wasn't to blame for the person's behavior toward me, and that it's notmy job to hold that person accountable for his/her actions (unless it IS my job, in which case I make every ethical and legal attempt to do so). It's liberating, when I can do it, which almost alwaystakes a cooling-off period first because I can getvery emotionalwhen people treat me badly. And sometimes, it's a process that I have to do a number of times before it really becomes a part of my normal everyday thinking. I'm crossing my fingers that the depression meds will soon be (if they're not already) something you don't need anymore!

Amaya
@amaya
4 years ago
301 posts

Thanks for sharing your experience! These are hard. There's a guy who makes yoga videos that I quite like, and after he has you all twisted up in some crazy yoga pose, he says, "...and breathe smoothly through...". I laugh every time at the ridiculousness of trying to "breathe smoothly through" when my muscles are screaming and I'm ready to topple over, but when I can do it, it's such a good feeling. It's good advice for something like this, too. You can do it. Compassion and gentleness for oneself is maybe the hardest one, but also the most important. Practice makes perfect. ...and breathe smoothly through...

Love,

Amaya

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