Befriending people with disabilities

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The Importance of Being Jonny
@the-importance-of-being-jonny
4 years ago
794 posts

I've become aware that people with disabilities are my good friends who, when everyone else leaves me, remain there by my side. I would guess this is because they, like us, are "different", so we share a closer bond than most people do. Has anyone noticed this in their lives? Even now, my roommate's brother Ricky is mentally a teenage boy, even though physically he is a 32 year old FURRY man. But when I was new to the household and felt out of place and shy, he was the only one I spoke to regularly and now we are good friends. He came to my room last night and said it's been nice knowing me and that he only says that to people he likes. :)

I have many memories befriending people with disabilities. Even as early as 2000 when I had my hip surgery, I befriended a boy named Jonathan in rehab, we had the same name, who wasn't able to speak, but when he found out I was being discharged, he was very sad and started crying. I gave him my number and he would call me and just hear me speak. That was a moment in my life that was very special to me because it was one of the first instances I made an impact on someone's life. I wonder what he's doing today and if he's all healed from his surgery.

Jonny


updated by @the-importance-of-being-jonny: 05/14/17 08:59:45AM
Nocturne's Angel
@nocturnes-angel
4 years ago
867 posts

I absolutely love this post :)

My grandmother used to always tell me when I was very young "To heed the words of the "Street Prophets" for they spoke the truth."

To this day her advise has never fallen on deaf ears, at least in my experience.

Huggs & Love,

Josette

Bill Walker
@bill-walker
4 years ago
729 posts

I have Multiple Sclerosis and of course wish that I didn't. However, I suspect that most people with disbilities are living on a higher level/frequency and are trying to clear as much of their karmic past as they can in one lifetime. This serves two purposes: Again, it allows for a quicker reduction of past karma allowing for this individual to move onto the next level. And second: It allows the disabled person to teach compassion to those people who aren't disabled by accepting their condition with love and understanding.

A lesson that has been, at times, very hard for me to accept, but I'm getting there slowly but surely!

The Importance of Being Jonny
@the-importance-of-being-jonny
4 years ago
794 posts

I'm confused when you say y'all. I have a disability as well, most empaths do. Life is a daily struggle for all of us. No one person has it worse than anyone else. My point was to say that, in my experience, I befriend people with disabilities. And I don't know if it's because I have a disability as well or because I am an empath. Whatever the reason, I can look back on all my friendships, and it is the ones with disabilities who are still in my life and who have been the best friends I could ever have. Being disabled doesn't mean you are less of a human as humans come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and forms.

The Importance of Being Jonny
@the-importance-of-being-jonny
4 years ago
794 posts

I somewhat thought that as well, Bill, that people with disabilities are living on a higher level than most people. Like we empaths are.

The Importance of Being Jonny
@the-importance-of-being-jonny
4 years ago
794 posts

:) Thank you for sharing your story Evelyn. Blessed be.

Jonny

The Importance of Being Jonny
@the-importance-of-being-jonny
4 years ago
794 posts

One of my best friends has spina bifida. I don't know him personally, we met through a group I moderate on Myspace which is now on Facebook, anyway, he is my rock, my source of inspiration. He's always rooting for me and there to cheer me up and vice versa. He is originally from Brooklyn, NY but moved to Philadelphia. When he would come back to Brooklyn to visit family I would try to meet up with him. But can't do that now as I live in Oregon. I remember not liking him at first, I think I found him annoying. lol, but no, he was way above annoying. He's my friend and I'm thankful to have him in my life.

The Importance of Being Jonny
@the-importance-of-being-jonny
4 years ago
794 posts

That's right. They accept others because they are in the same situation where people may not accept them. Your spelling's just fine. :)

B
@b
4 years ago
252 posts
when I was a kid growing up we had a girl in the neighborhood with MS she was bound to a wheelchair but had the greatest spirit of anybody I've ever met.being in the neighborhood of course I be friended her and always used to goof around to make her laugh I was very successfulI. I don't know if she is still alive cuz she got ms very young or possibly was born with it and didn't have a long expectancy for life back in the 70's.another instance of a wheelchair-bound woman was in Newport Rhode Island in the early 90's I was in the Coast Guard and some of us went to a gin mill on our motorcycles.there was a whole crew of disabled people partying the night before the Newport to Bermuda sailboat race I befriended this lady in a wheelchair mainly because no one was paying her any attention and I made her smile and laugh and told her I needed to get her on the back of my bike for a quick ride. We laughed and joked and had a nice time together but I've never seen her again.I don't seek out people with disabilities but if I come across them I feel the need to pay them attention. I love that EC community , it seems every day I get on I read a post that resonates with me. quite comforting really thank you for all That post.
Cheshire Cat
@cheshire-cat
4 years ago
1,185 posts

Hi Jonny,

Just now found this thread and wanted to say I think it's wonderful you've befriended people with disabilities.

I've been disabled for 27 years, and I can tell you that most friends dessert us after awhile, some immediately. Some even get mad at us for being sick. I was lucky that I am a loyal friend and was still in touch with my childhood pals, who've stuck by me. The newer the friend was, however, the quicker they were gone.

My older friends were more likely to be eggheads like me, and just love to sit around and talk about ideas. The newer ones reflected the totally different place I have to live now, and were more action oriented. I could no longer do and go so I was of no use. I am much better at just being now though, a difficult lesson for a Type A like me.

I think most of us become so isolated, at least the ones I talk to with my illness (stage IV Neuroborreliosis aka incurable Lyme Disease), that many start to like it, since they do not have to try to hold a conversation anymore when in agony. The rest of us are alone way too much, so I think we really appreciate anyone who is a decent enough human being like you ,who looks past the disability and sees the person. If you make friends with one of us, you've got a friend for life, because we won't forget that you were there when nobody else was.

Tami
@tami
4 years ago
81 posts
My closest friends have disabilities. I never really paid attention to that. Inside they are great people. Like some others have said--I too tend to gravitate to those who are not perfect.
B
@b
4 years ago
252 posts
Cause you are an empath silly
Dice
@dice
4 years ago
284 posts

Hi Jonny,

Thank you for sharing. I too am drawn to people that are in a lonely place in life. It was not hard for me to do.. Those relationships are valuable and I have a couple at a critical time in my life that changed everything for me. It was a time I had to take my first big stand... and I will never forget it. I think about these friends all the time.. one I have since found.. and the first thing she brings up to me is..."remember that time... " . I still know I made the right choice...

Candice

Have a great one!

Candice

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