A revealing look inside the life of a sociopath

Hop Daddy
Hop Daddy
@hop-daddy
one month ago
1,065 posts

I was reading this article and was taken aback by how brutal this sociopathic author treated others. Everything is a game of use, abuse, and self-empowerment with her and her relationships. And after reading this I also realized how I have often mischaracterized people as narcissists when they are really more likely a sociopath.


I think this is a good article to share and discuss since empaths are likely to be caught up in a sociopath's web. After reading the article please share your sociopath stories and observations.


https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/articles/201305/confessions-sociopath


Cheshire Cat
Cheshire Cat
@cheshire-cat
one month ago
1,441 posts

Hi Hop,

Not had time to read article yet... will read it while eating lunch, thanks. Here are some stats for anyone reading this though: It will be interesting to see if this article posts different percentages that are more recent than ones I've seen....

Narcissists = full blown NPD, not just selfish people, are 1 or 2% of the population.

Sociopaths = made, not born, due to abuse/neglect, are 4 or 5% of the population.

Psychopaths = born, not made, have 2 brain structures unlike the rest of us, are 1 % of the population.

Zacharias
Zacharias
@zacharias
one month ago
197 posts

That sociopathic stare she talked about. I've seen it hundreds of times. I wonder whats going on in their minds. It's disconcerting and can't feel anything from them at that moment. Actually, I can't feel much at all from these people(except when they get angry). They are easy to be around because of this. All I feel from them is "need". I want to give them what they want. They are looking for fulfillment of that need. It's like they can't feel anything from another person without inflicting pain in order to get a strong emotional reaction. They want to feel this emotional connection we feel naturally. They don't seem to care what that emotion is as long as it's strong enough. She talked about giving her brother $10,000. That would be another way to get a strong reaction. Sex is another. I see why psychopaths tend to torture people in the worst ways. They go to that extreme eventually when nothing they do works. They just want to feel that they are not alone. There is more at play here, but I think this is the basis of the disorder. We need our parents to be on our side. We need connection. A psychopath is created by generations of neglect. 

Back to that SP stare. Of course, I see it in my wife when I confront her about what she is doing. As I explain the situation she'll give me that stare and I know that nothing I say is penetrating. What she hears at that moment isn't what I say. The mask she wears is also a filter for what she hears. The interesting thing about that is what she thinks I'm saying is actually what her conscience is telling her. She'll reject it thinking that it is criticism coming from me. The stare IS the mask.  

Cheshire Cat
Cheshire Cat
@cheshire-cat
one month ago
1,441 posts

Yikes. I had to take notes while eating, I got so upset with the sloppy use of terminology here.

She starts out saying she is a psychopath, but right away it is obviously not true, since she says she loves some family and friends. Unlike the poetic license taken on TV shows like Dexter, psychopaths cannot love anyone. The numbers she quotes are for sociopaths, not psychopaths.

Later, she switches to calling herself a sociopath, which is the correct diagnosis based on the abuse she endured at the hands of her mentally ill father, and that is confirmed at the end of this long article, though shrinks have been fooled by these people too, especially the smart ones can fool them sometimes.

When she writes of sneaking into homes to move items around, a psychopath would probably not take that risk, because they don't have to do that to get what they want.

About 70% of the criminal population qualifies for a diagnosis of sociopathy to some extent. Psychopaths hardly ever get caught. Instead, they get elected to office, promoted to CEO, allowed to operate on your body as surgeons, and put in the pulpit! Yes, those are their 4 top professions. They love having power over people and won't let anything stop them from getting it.

Not so for sociopaths, who are over represented at the bottom levels of society, so in that sense, she has achieved the operational level of a psychopath by becoming a professor, if most of this is even true. I did not see any sources for much of her claims and grandiosity is common in all forms of ASPD and NPD.

There are so many clues to who she is in the article, the names and many circumstances must all have been changed, or she'd have been outed by now. It does not say the author name given is an alias, but I cannot see how it could not be one. 

It is an interesting account of the life of an unusually smart narcissistic sociopath. I just wish it had stated that and not wandered around into other territory. I am sad that Psych Today has sunk so low that they apparently do not even proofread their own articles. I'm not surprised though, since I see this all over the place now. Journalism is dead. Just my two cents, or maybe ten cents, since this post got too long....

Hop Daddy
Hop Daddy
@hop-daddy
one month ago
1,065 posts

@cheshire-cat :


Thanks for the population percentages. I was surprised to see that sociopaths are more common than narcs. What do you mean by made not born for sociopaths? Are you saying they are conditioned that way? And thanks for all of your above insight.

Hop Daddy
Hop Daddy
@hop-daddy
one month ago
1,065 posts

@zacharias :


We've discussed in this community how scary it would be if an empath ever turned to the dark side and used their abilities for the bad. And after reading this article, I think I now understand that sociopaths can read people's energies like we can but use that as a manipulation tool or weapon to hurt them. That is scary. And I think when they stare someone down that's what they are doing. They are feeling a person's energy and calculating how they can take advantage.


Interestingly, when I have crossed paths with narcs, their insecure energy pours off of them and I generally make them uncomfortable with my energy around them. But in the few occasions I've been in the presence of a sociopath, I don't remember being able to read their energy and just felt nothing. But I could also pick up on them trying to scan me.

Cheshire Cat
Cheshire Cat
@cheshire-cat
one month ago
1,441 posts

Hop-daddy,

    Sociopaths come from abuse and/or neglect in the early childhood learning years, which  makes them the way they are. They learn to abuse and "act out" against others, just as you imprint your parents hopefully warm and loving behavior, and they do not learn empathy or caring. They may be brought up into a gang situation or organized crime where they are taught to love  a small group that meets narrow qualifications, like only other Mafia members, for example. The gang may become a family substitute, since their blood "family" is addicted, mentally ill or both. 

    In the article, she talks a lot about how crazy and violent her father was, a great example of how this happens, both from learned and inherited behavior...this is called "epigenetic". Her father probably experienced violence from his parent(s) but research is showing a genetic basis for a lot of this as we do more genetic research. Epigenetic means you have genes for an issue present, but something in the environment must turn them on to cause problems. 

    Psychopaths are born with smaller brain areas for both empathy and conscience. I've heard one psychopath say that they are another species, sent here to rule us, since they are not burdened by our "weakness" of having emotions and that if we doubt this, we should look at nature, which proves them right. Chilling. 

Zacharias
Zacharias
@zacharias
one month ago
197 posts

I've had friends that are psychopaths. I used to run with these people. They were all really screwed up, and so was I. The narcs are a blessing in comparison. 

Growing up I thought I was insane, so I hung out with insane people. I was lucky I didn't end up in a barrel. I saw them do horrible things without a thought. The stories they told were even worse. I think the number is higher than 1%. There are many more serial killers and rapist out there than we know about. 

The narcs are trying to hide. Sociopaths don't seem to care enough to try. I know of one that lied to the entire VFW about being a prisoner of war in Vietnam. He told this story to me first. So I looked it up. His name was not on any list I could find. I didn't have to tell the VFW commander that this guy was a liar. He already knew. That was bold. He still acts as though he was never caught. He had no fear and no shame.

Zacharias
Zacharias
@zacharias
one month ago
197 posts

Also, the genetic link. Our ancestry is very important. Mine is rich with warriors that did things out of the ordinary. They fought against forces that were greater than themselves. They were imprisoned and died for their beliefs. I'm even related to Mary Queen of Scots. I have a lot to live up to If I am to fulfill the legacy. I know that empathy is genetic, so psychopathy has to be as well. I think our ancestors actions actually changes DNA. Just a thought.

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